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Its name was coined by translating the French phrase coup de soleil. What condition is it?




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Answer: sunstroke

The first OED citation for the word is from 1851. Similarly: a coup d'état is a stroke of the state (an attempt to topple the government); a coup de grâce is stroke of grace (a blow that kills a wounded creature); a coup de main is a stroke of hand (a sudden attack); a coup d'oeil is a stroke of the eye (a comprehensive glance); and a coup de foudre is a stroke of lightning (a sudden unforeseen event, such as love at first sight).

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Hey Mootguy, all the places I checked listed coup de soleil as sunburn not sunstroke.

[Mootguy: Here's the OED's entry for sunstroke: "For the earlier 'stroke of the sun', transl. F. coup de soleil. Cf. G. sonnenstich.] Collapse or prostration, with or without fever, caused by exposure to excessive heat of the sun. Also loosely extended to similar effects of heat from other sources, as electric sunstroke 1807 J. Johnson Oriental Voy. 14 --- Several of the people got sick, with ... what are called 'Coups de Soleil', or strokes of the Sun. 1823 Gentl. Mag. XCIII. ii. 647/2 ---- He instantly expressed a feeling of having received what is called 'a stroke of the sun'. 1851 G. W. Curtis Nile Notes xxxvii. 188 ----- Warding off sun-strokes with huge heavy umbrellas of two thicknesses of blue cotton. 1865 Dickens Let. to E. Yates 30 Sept. ----- I got a slight sunstroke last Thursday. ]
danimalev at hotmail.com
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Hello, I'm French. Coup de main may be a sudden attack in 16th-century French, but nowadays when you give a coup de main to someone you lend him a hand, you help him out. "J'ai donné un coup de main pour décharger la bois du voisin" (I helped the neighbour unload the wood)
sebtrois at hotmail.com
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