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It derives from the Latin frangere, to break, and it labels a set of patterns that cannot be represented by classical geometry; what word is it?




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Answer: fractal

The word fractal derives from the Latin fractus, the past participle of frangere, to break.

It denotes a pattern created from parts that are smaller replicas of the whole pattern, which are themselves created from parts that are smaller replicas of the whole pattern, which are themselves created ....

They were invented by a Frenchman name Julia Gaston , but the term was coined by Benoit Mandelbrot. Here's an example:


Fractals are what nerds see when they close their eyes



For higher resolution examples of Julia Gaston
tm)s fractals go to: http://www.fractsurf.de/e_index2.html?e_bios.html

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